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Do THIS before eating carbs (every time)



Controversial Health Topic:

At the link below, we're going to show you our #1 carb-fighting trick that you can use each and every time you eat carbs. This simple carb-fighting "ritual" is clinically proven to:


*Lower your blood sugar
*Increase insulin sensitivity
*Decrease fat storage
*Increase fat burning


Even better, you can perform it in just a few seconds...and it WORKS like gangbusters.

==> Do THIS before eating carbs (every time)

Enjoy!







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t take that at all to mean that we're constructing reality," he told LiveScience.All in the mindAs members of society, people create a form of collective reality. "We are all part of a community of minds," Freeman says in the show.For example, money, in reality, consists of pieces of paper, yet those papers represent something much more valuable. The pieces of paper have the power of life and death, Freeman says but they wouldn't be worth anything if people didn't believe in their power.Money is fiction, but it's useful fiction.Another fiction humans collectively engage in is optimism. Neuroscientist Tali Sharot of University College London studies "the optimism bias": people's tendency to generally overestimate the likelihood of positive events in their lives and underestimate the likelihood of negative ones.In the show, Sharot does an experiment in which she puts a man in a brain scanner, and asks him to rate the likelihood that negative events, such as lung cancer, will happen to him. Then, he is given the true likelihood.When the actual risks differ from the man's estimates, his frontal lobes light up. But the brain area does a better job of reacting to the discrepancy when the reality is more positive than what he guessed, Sharot said.This shows how humans are somewhat hardwired to be optimistic. That may be because optimism "tends to have a lot of positive outcomes," Sharot told LiveScience. Optimistic people tend to live longer July 19, 2013: Emergency personnel are on the scene at Six Flags Over Texas in Arlington, Texas, after a woman died on the Texas Giant roller coaster.AP/The Dallas Morning News, Tom FoxARLINGTON, Texas Authorities said Saturday that a woman who died Friday evening in an accident while riding the roller coaster at a Texas amusement park appeared to fall off the ride.Arlington Police Sgt. Christopher Cook told The Associated Press on Saturday that there appears to have been no foul play in Friday's death at the Six Flags Over Texas park in Arlington. Police say the Texas Department of Insurance, which approves amusement rides, is involved in investigating the accident.The accident happened just after 6:30 p.m. Friday at Six Flags Over Texas in Arlington. Park spokeswoman Sharon Parker confirmed that a woman died while riding the coaster at Six Flags Over Texas in Arlington but did not specify how she was killed.A family in line behind the woman, identified by family members to MyFoxDFW.com as Rosy Esparza, said that Esparza was on the ride with her daughter and son-in-law. The family said her seat restraint seemed to go down normally before the car left. They said when the train came back, the seat restraint was down.The family said Esparza's daughter and son-in-law were calling for help. They were screaming, "We need to go get my mom!"Witnesses told local media outlets that the woman fell from the ride, which is billed as the tallest