Expo/Science & Industry/Cosmos in a Computer

COSMOS IN A COMPUTER


Witness the birth of the cosmos, watch the universe unfold,
all from your desktop.

Sounds ambitious, but cosmologists are doing just that:
developing powerful computer models that "evolve" the universe
from the Big Bang to the present.

The scientists are asking some basic but tough questions:


How did our universe come to be what it is today?

How could galaxies and galaxy clusters emerge from the inferno of creation?

What is the ultimate fate of the universe?

If you're curious to find out more, why not travel to the beginnings of time itself, back to today, then fast forward into the future? For a sneak preview of this exhibit, take a look at the QuickTime movie below. However, the movie is rather large (14.6 MB!), so be patient when downloading. It'll take a few minutes. (Further information on downloading movies can be obtained from the Technical Corner and Navigation Tips.)

Have a great trip!

Back to the Beginning

QuickTime (14.6 MB); MPEG (7.1 MB); Sound (3.2 MB); Thumbnail (18K); Script (Text)

Credits and Acknowledgments

The movie script itself contains links that will take you into this exhibit. Or choose from the menu below. Remember, there's a hierarchical map of all the main documents that will help you navigate.

Cosmic Mystery Tour

How did the universe begin? How did it come to be in its present state?


Our Hierarchical Universe

What can the universe's present structure tell us about its evolution and ultimate fate?


Cosmology Goes Digital

Why are computers essential to understanding the universe? What does it take to compute the cosmos?


Cosmos in Fast Forward

Scientific animations...lots of them.


Frontiers of Cosmology

Summing up. Speculations on tomorrow's cosmologies.


Bibliography

Books, papers and articles.


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Copyright © 1995, The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois


NCSA. Last modified 10/17/95